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Proteomics

Translating Proteomics Episode 5 – Why the Dogma around Biology’s Central Dogma Is Wrong

Nautilus Biotechnology

Nautilus Biotechnology

May 22, 2024


‘Translating Proteomics’ explores the science of proteomics and its growing impact on biological research, biomarker discovery, drug development, food and energy security, and a range of other timely topics. The goal of these conversations is to expose you to important issues in proteomics, deepen your love of science, and prompt you to question assumptions about what may be possible.

Your hosts are Drs. Parag Mallick and Andreas Huhmer of Nautilus Biotechnology. Parag is an Associate Professor at Stanford University whose lab performs systems biology studies that drive precision medicine approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Andreas is a veteran scientist whose industry work has supported thousands of proteomics researchers by helping to bring the latest mass spec technologies into their labs.

All Translating Proteomics episode links

Ep 1 – Poised for a Proteomics Breakthrough
Ep 2 – Putting Proteomics to Work
Ep 3 – Biology in Space and Time
Ep 4 – Single-protein Biomarkers Don’t Cut It
Ep 5 – Why the Dogma around Biology’s Central Dogma Is Wrong (You’re here)
Ep 6 – The Future of AI in Biomedicine

Subscribe to the Translating Proteomics podcast on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast outlet

Episode 5 – Why the Dogma around Biology’s Central Dogma Is Wrong

From high school biology on up, we’re taught the central dogma of biology – that biological information flows from DNA to RNA to proteins. This representation of the central dogma is, however, very much a simplification of its original formulation by Francis Crick and over-applying it can lead us down spurious paths and faulty conclusions. In this episode of Translating Proteomics, Parag and Andreas dive into the real meaning of the central dogma and discuss how modern biology research, including proteomics, shows we must drastically alter the ways we use and interpret the central dogma.

Chapters:

00:00 – What the central dogma actually says

08:06 – Why it’s important to develop models of biology that account for regulation

11:58 – How new tools will help us make better models of biology

Some key points of discussion:

  • The central dogma is a description of where proteins come from
  • Regulation is not encapsulated in the central dogma
  • We need new models of biology and perhaps even a general theory of biology

Subscribe to the Translating Proteomics podcast on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast outlet

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